OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /home/wubwub/public_html/feed/magpierss-0.72/rss_parse.inc on line 153

Example Output

Channel: North Carolina Chronicle

RSS URL:

Parsed Results (var_dump'ed)

object(MagpieRSS)#4 (23) {
  ["parser"]=>
  resource(5) of type (Unknown)
  ["current_item"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["items"]=>
  array(10) {
    [0]=>
    array(11) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(93) "Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives"
      ["link"]=>
      string(124) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/raleigh-firefighters-first-responders-stepdaughter-honored-with-save-award-for-saving-lives/"
      ["dc"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["creator"]=>
        string(10) "Bill Moran"
      }
      ["pubdate"]=>
      string(31) "Thu, 17 Jun 2021 00:17:11 +0000"
      ["category"]=>
      string(7) "Raleigh"
      ["guid"]=>
      string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8462"
      ["description"]=>
      string(2017) "
Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – Jim Sink of Raleigh is grateful to be alive after suffering a heart attack in April 2020 and collapsing while mowing his lawn. His stepdaughter, Lauren Roth, began resuscitation until the local firefighters arrived and took over. “I’m so grateful for these gentlemen and for Lolo,” said Sink, referring to Roth […]

The post Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3926) "
Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – Jim Sink of Raleigh is grateful to be alive after suffering a heart attack in April 2020 and collapsing while mowing his lawn. His stepdaughter, Lauren Roth, began resuscitation until the local firefighters arrived and took over.

“I’m so grateful for these gentlemen and for Lolo,” said Sink, referring to Roth by her nickname. “I wasn’t really there at the time and I wasn’t aware of it, but she started, did a great job and then these gentlemen came along.”

Rescue workers said Roth’s early CPR was instrumental in Sink’s success and they hope it will help raise awareness of the importance of learning the life-saving procedure.

While Sink is eternally grateful to all of those who worked to save his life, it was the firefighters’ move after Sink was on his way to the hospital that earned them the State Fire Marshal’s SAVE Award.

“They did everything their duty was to mow the lawn for me and my children,” said Sink.

Firefighters stopped the gardening work Sink had started while he was being rushed to the hospital as a small gesture to show their support for him and his family.

“The thought for me and the crew was that you had all been through a traumatic incident, and to come home and find the lawn mower still in the garden, to remember that it didn’t go that way, that would have been your last thought, “explained Lt. Randall Smith of the Raleigh Fire Department.

He added, “My thought was to try and get the garden back where it should be when he got home so that he had good memories of everything and hopefully everything that turned out fine all around.”

For the extra mile, six first aiders and seven firefighters from Raleigh, together with Roth, received the SAVE Award, which is given to professionals who save lives beyond their duty.

“We are grateful,” said Sink. “I had two new grandchildren this year after everything I’ve been through, seen and part of their lives. And all I can say is just a big thank you for the love they showed my family we are grateful. ”

Copyright © 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

The post Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(2017) "
Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – Jim Sink of Raleigh is grateful to be alive after suffering a heart attack in April 2020 and collapsing while mowing his lawn. His stepdaughter, Lauren Roth, began resuscitation until the local firefighters arrived and took over. “I’m so grateful for these gentlemen and for Lolo,” said Sink, referring to Roth […]

The post Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(3926) "
Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – Jim Sink of Raleigh is grateful to be alive after suffering a heart attack in April 2020 and collapsing while mowing his lawn. His stepdaughter, Lauren Roth, began resuscitation until the local firefighters arrived and took over.

“I’m so grateful for these gentlemen and for Lolo,” said Sink, referring to Roth by her nickname. “I wasn’t really there at the time and I wasn’t aware of it, but she started, did a great job and then these gentlemen came along.”

Rescue workers said Roth’s early CPR was instrumental in Sink’s success and they hope it will help raise awareness of the importance of learning the life-saving procedure.

While Sink is eternally grateful to all of those who worked to save his life, it was the firefighters’ move after Sink was on his way to the hospital that earned them the State Fire Marshal’s SAVE Award.

“They did everything their duty was to mow the lawn for me and my children,” said Sink.

Firefighters stopped the gardening work Sink had started while he was being rushed to the hospital as a small gesture to show their support for him and his family.

“The thought for me and the crew was that you had all been through a traumatic incident, and to come home and find the lawn mower still in the garden, to remember that it didn’t go that way, that would have been your last thought, “explained Lt. Randall Smith of the Raleigh Fire Department.

He added, “My thought was to try and get the garden back where it should be when he got home so that he had good memories of everything and hopefully everything that turned out fine all around.”

For the extra mile, six first aiders and seven firefighters from Raleigh, together with Roth, received the SAVE Award, which is given to professionals who save lives beyond their duty.

“We are grateful,” said Sink. “I had two new grandchildren this year after everything I’ve been through, seen and part of their lives. And all I can say is just a big thank you for the love they showed my family we are grateful. ”

Copyright © 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

The post Raleigh firefighters, first responders, stepdaughter honored with SAVE Award for saving lives first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623889031) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(70) "Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park" ["link"]=> string(103) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/greensboro-police-are-investigating-the-death-of-a-man-in-bur-mil-park/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 21:54:03 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8459" ["description"]=> string(1536) "
Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park

Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man who was hit by a falling tree in Bur-Mil Park Tuesday morning. First responders were alerted at 10:27 a.m. in front of an unconscious man on the Big Loop Trail. Police confirmed on Wednesday that the man was hit by a falling tree. First responded to […]

The post Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2486) "
Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park

Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man who was hit by a falling tree in Bur-Mil Park Tuesday morning. First responders were alerted at 10:27 a.m. in front of an unconscious man on the Big Loop Trail. Police confirmed on Wednesday that the man was hit by a falling tree. First responded to first aid at the scene before he was rushed to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police said. Due to the severity of the incident, the Big Loop Trail will remain closed to the public. This is a developing story. Check again for updates.

Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man who was hit by a falling tree in Bur-Mil Park on Tuesday morning.

First responders were alerted at 10:27 a.m. in front of an unconscious man on the Big Loop Trail

Police confirmed on Wednesday that the man was hit by a falling tree.

First responded to first aid at the scene before he was rushed to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police said.

Due to the severity of the incident, the Big Loop Trail will remain closed to the public.

This is a developing story.

Check back for updates.

The post Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1536) "
Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park

Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man who was hit by a falling tree in Bur-Mil Park Tuesday morning. First responders were alerted at 10:27 a.m. in front of an unconscious man on the Big Loop Trail. Police confirmed on Wednesday that the man was hit by a falling tree. First responded to […]

The post Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2486) "
Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park

Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man who was hit by a falling tree in Bur-Mil Park Tuesday morning. First responders were alerted at 10:27 a.m. in front of an unconscious man on the Big Loop Trail. Police confirmed on Wednesday that the man was hit by a falling tree. First responded to first aid at the scene before he was rushed to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police said. Due to the severity of the incident, the Big Loop Trail will remain closed to the public. This is a developing story. Check again for updates.

Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man who was hit by a falling tree in Bur-Mil Park on Tuesday morning.

First responders were alerted at 10:27 a.m. in front of an unconscious man on the Big Loop Trail

Police confirmed on Wednesday that the man was hit by a falling tree.

First responded to first aid at the scene before he was rushed to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police said.

Due to the severity of the incident, the Big Loop Trail will remain closed to the public.

This is a developing story.

Check back for updates.

The post Greensboro Police are investigating the death of a man in Bur-Mil Park first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623880443) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(73) "A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics" ["link"]=> string(106) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/a-pioneering-chemical-approach-could-lead-to-more-robust-soft-electronics/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 19:15:40 +0000" ["category"]=> string(6) "Durham" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8456" ["description"]=> string(1437) "
A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics

PICTURE: A new approach to studying conjugated polymers enabled an Army-funded research team to measure the mechanical and kinetic properties of individual molecules during polymerization for the first time … view More Photo credit: Udit Chakraborty, Cornell University RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC – A new approach to studying conjugated polymers allowed an Army-funded research team […]

The post A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7475) "
A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics

PICTURE: A new approach to studying conjugated polymers enabled an Army-funded research team to measure the mechanical and kinetic properties of individual molecules during polymerization for the first time … view More

Photo credit: Udit Chakraborty, Cornell University

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC – A new approach to studying conjugated polymers allowed an Army-funded research team to measure the mechanical and kinetic properties of individual molecules during the polymerization reaction for the first time. The lessons learned could lead to more flexible and robust soft electronic materials like health monitors and soft robotics.

Conjugated polymers are essentially collections of molecules strung along a backbone that can conduct electrons and absorb light. This makes them perfect for developing soft optoelectronics, such as portable electronic devices; however, these polymers, flexible as they are, are difficult to study in bulk because they aggregate and fall out of solution.

“Conjugated polymers are a fascinating class of materials because of their inherent optical and electronic properties, which are determined by their polymer structure,” said Dr. Dawanne Poree, Program Manager for the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, known as DEVCOM, Army Research Laboratory. “These materials are of interest to the Army and Department of Defense for a number of uses, including wearable electronics, handheld devices, sensors, and optical communication systems. Unfortunately, to date it has been difficult to develop conjugated polymers for targeted applications due to a lack of useful tools to study and correlate their structure-property relationships. “

With support from the Army, researchers at Cornell University took an approach they had developed with other synthetic polymers, called magnetic tweezers, which enabled them to stretch and twist individual molecules of the conjugated polymer polyacetylene. The research was published in the journal Chem.

“Using novel single-molecule manipulation and imaging approaches, this work provided the first observations of single chain behavior in conjugated polymers, which forms the basis for the rational design and processing of these materials to enable broad application,” said Poree.

Previous efforts to study the solubility of conjugated polymers have often relied on chemical derivatization, in which the structures were modified with functional groups of atoms. However, this approach can compromise the innate properties of the polymer.

“The conjugated polymer is really a prototype,” said Dr. Peng Chen, Peter JW Debye Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Cornell. “You always modify it to tailor it to the application. We hope that everything we’ve measured – the basic synthetic kinetics properties, the mechanical properties – become benchmarks for people to think about other polymers in the same category.”

In 2017, Chen’s group was the first to use magnetic tweezers to study living polymerization and visualize it at the single-molecule level. The technique had already been used in biophysics to study DNA and proteins, but no one had successfully expanded it to include synthetic polymers.

The process works by attaching one end of a polymer strand to a coverslip and the other end to a tiny magnetic particle. The researchers then use a magnetic field to manipulate the conjugated polymer, stretch or twist it, and measure the response of a single growing polymer chain.

The amounts are so small that they remain soluble in solution in a way that would normally not be the case with large amounts.

The team measured in real time how long chains of conjugated polymers, which consist of hundreds of thousands of monomer units, grow. They discovered that these polymers add a new monomer every second, a growth much faster than their unconjugated analogues.

“We found that this polymer forms conformational entanglement in real time as it grows,” said Chen. “All of the polymers we’ve studied have conformational entanglements, but this conjugated polymer has a looser conformational entanglement, which makes it grow faster.”

By pulling and stretching individual conjugated polymers, called force strain measurements, researchers were able to assess their stiffness and better understand how they can bend in different directions while remaining conjugated and maintaining electronic conductivity.

They also discovered that from one chain to the next, the polymers exhibited different mechanical behaviors that were predicted by theory but never observed experimentally.

The results underscore both the uniqueness of conjugated polymers for a range of applications and the power of using a single molecule manipulation and imaging technique on synthetic materials.

“Now we have a new way to study how these conjugated polymers are made chemically and what the basic mechanical properties of this type of material are,” said Chen. “We can study how these fundamental properties change when they are tailored for use. Maybe you can make it more mechanically flexible and make the polymer longer or adjust the synthesis conditions to synthesize the polymer either faster or slower. “

###

Visit the lab’s media center to learn about Army science and technology

As the national armed forces research laboratory, ARL is in the process of operationalizing science in order to achieve a transformative overburden. By working across the command’s core technical competencies, we are leaders in discovering, developing, and delivering the technology-based skills needed to make soldiers more successful, win the nation’s wars, and get home safely. The DEVCOM Army Research Laboratory is part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command. DEVCOM is a major subordinate command of the Army Futures Command.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of press releases sent to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of information via the EurekAlert system.

The post A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1437) "
A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics

PICTURE: A new approach to studying conjugated polymers enabled an Army-funded research team to measure the mechanical and kinetic properties of individual molecules during polymerization for the first time … view More Photo credit: Udit Chakraborty, Cornell University RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC – A new approach to studying conjugated polymers allowed an Army-funded research team […]

The post A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(7475) "
A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics

PICTURE: A new approach to studying conjugated polymers enabled an Army-funded research team to measure the mechanical and kinetic properties of individual molecules during polymerization for the first time … view More

Photo credit: Udit Chakraborty, Cornell University

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC – A new approach to studying conjugated polymers allowed an Army-funded research team to measure the mechanical and kinetic properties of individual molecules during the polymerization reaction for the first time. The lessons learned could lead to more flexible and robust soft electronic materials like health monitors and soft robotics.

Conjugated polymers are essentially collections of molecules strung along a backbone that can conduct electrons and absorb light. This makes them perfect for developing soft optoelectronics, such as portable electronic devices; however, these polymers, flexible as they are, are difficult to study in bulk because they aggregate and fall out of solution.

“Conjugated polymers are a fascinating class of materials because of their inherent optical and electronic properties, which are determined by their polymer structure,” said Dr. Dawanne Poree, Program Manager for the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, known as DEVCOM, Army Research Laboratory. “These materials are of interest to the Army and Department of Defense for a number of uses, including wearable electronics, handheld devices, sensors, and optical communication systems. Unfortunately, to date it has been difficult to develop conjugated polymers for targeted applications due to a lack of useful tools to study and correlate their structure-property relationships. “

With support from the Army, researchers at Cornell University took an approach they had developed with other synthetic polymers, called magnetic tweezers, which enabled them to stretch and twist individual molecules of the conjugated polymer polyacetylene. The research was published in the journal Chem.

“Using novel single-molecule manipulation and imaging approaches, this work provided the first observations of single chain behavior in conjugated polymers, which forms the basis for the rational design and processing of these materials to enable broad application,” said Poree.

Previous efforts to study the solubility of conjugated polymers have often relied on chemical derivatization, in which the structures were modified with functional groups of atoms. However, this approach can compromise the innate properties of the polymer.

“The conjugated polymer is really a prototype,” said Dr. Peng Chen, Peter JW Debye Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Cornell. “You always modify it to tailor it to the application. We hope that everything we’ve measured – the basic synthetic kinetics properties, the mechanical properties – become benchmarks for people to think about other polymers in the same category.”

In 2017, Chen’s group was the first to use magnetic tweezers to study living polymerization and visualize it at the single-molecule level. The technique had already been used in biophysics to study DNA and proteins, but no one had successfully expanded it to include synthetic polymers.

The process works by attaching one end of a polymer strand to a coverslip and the other end to a tiny magnetic particle. The researchers then use a magnetic field to manipulate the conjugated polymer, stretch or twist it, and measure the response of a single growing polymer chain.

The amounts are so small that they remain soluble in solution in a way that would normally not be the case with large amounts.

The team measured in real time how long chains of conjugated polymers, which consist of hundreds of thousands of monomer units, grow. They discovered that these polymers add a new monomer every second, a growth much faster than their unconjugated analogues.

“We found that this polymer forms conformational entanglement in real time as it grows,” said Chen. “All of the polymers we’ve studied have conformational entanglements, but this conjugated polymer has a looser conformational entanglement, which makes it grow faster.”

By pulling and stretching individual conjugated polymers, called force strain measurements, researchers were able to assess their stiffness and better understand how they can bend in different directions while remaining conjugated and maintaining electronic conductivity.

They also discovered that from one chain to the next, the polymers exhibited different mechanical behaviors that were predicted by theory but never observed experimentally.

The results underscore both the uniqueness of conjugated polymers for a range of applications and the power of using a single molecule manipulation and imaging technique on synthetic materials.

“Now we have a new way to study how these conjugated polymers are made chemically and what the basic mechanical properties of this type of material are,” said Chen. “We can study how these fundamental properties change when they are tailored for use. Maybe you can make it more mechanically flexible and make the polymer longer or adjust the synthesis conditions to synthesize the polymer either faster or slower. “

###

Visit the lab’s media center to learn about Army science and technology

As the national armed forces research laboratory, ARL is in the process of operationalizing science in order to achieve a transformative overburden. By working across the command’s core technical competencies, we are leaders in discovering, developing, and delivering the technology-based skills needed to make soldiers more successful, win the nation’s wars, and get home safely. The DEVCOM Army Research Laboratory is part of the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command. DEVCOM is a major subordinate command of the Army Futures Command.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of press releases sent to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of information via the EurekAlert system.

The post A pioneering chemical approach could lead to more robust soft electronics first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623870940) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(97) "Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year | Local" ["link"]=> string(127) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/rabies-raccoon-found-in-greensboro-marks-the-fourth-case-of-rabies-in-guilford-this-year-local/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 17:52:15 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8453" ["description"]=> string(1623) "
Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year |  Local

GREENSBORO – A raccoon found on Lindley Road tested positive for rabies, the Guilford County Health Department said in a press release on Wednesday. This is the fourth confirmed case of animal rabies in 2021, the health department said. North Carolina law requires that all pets (cats, dogs, and ferrets), whether indoors or outdoors, be […]

The post Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year | Local first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2678) "
Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year |  Local

GREENSBORO – A raccoon found on Lindley Road tested positive for rabies, the Guilford County Health Department said in a press release on Wednesday.

This is the fourth confirmed case of animal rabies in 2021, the health department said.

North Carolina law requires that all pets (cats, dogs, and ferrets), whether indoors or outdoors, be vaccinated against rabies from 4 months of age.

The health department urges pet owners to supervise their pets outdoors to prevent contact with wildlife that may have rabies.

Rabies circulates all year round.

Support local journalism

Your subscription enables our reporting.

{{featured_button_text}}

Here are some tips from the health department to help prevent you or your family from being exposed to the rabies virus:

• Avoid direct contact with wildlife, dead or alive. Do not approach, try to play with, touch, rescue, or treat wildlife. If you find a sick or injured animal, contact Animal Control at 336-641-5990.

• Avoid animals that show unnatural behavior. Wild animals are usually not friendly so be very careful when someone approaches you.

• Do not try to separate fighting animals.

• Feed your pets indoors. Leaving food outside will attract dogs, cats, and other wildlife into your yard.

The post Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year | Local first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1623) "
Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year |  Local

GREENSBORO – A raccoon found on Lindley Road tested positive for rabies, the Guilford County Health Department said in a press release on Wednesday. This is the fourth confirmed case of animal rabies in 2021, the health department said. North Carolina law requires that all pets (cats, dogs, and ferrets), whether indoors or outdoors, be […]

The post Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year | Local first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2678) "
Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year |  Local

GREENSBORO – A raccoon found on Lindley Road tested positive for rabies, the Guilford County Health Department said in a press release on Wednesday.

This is the fourth confirmed case of animal rabies in 2021, the health department said.

North Carolina law requires that all pets (cats, dogs, and ferrets), whether indoors or outdoors, be vaccinated against rabies from 4 months of age.

The health department urges pet owners to supervise their pets outdoors to prevent contact with wildlife that may have rabies.

Rabies circulates all year round.

Support local journalism

Your subscription enables our reporting.

{{featured_button_text}}

Here are some tips from the health department to help prevent you or your family from being exposed to the rabies virus:

• Avoid direct contact with wildlife, dead or alive. Do not approach, try to play with, touch, rescue, or treat wildlife. If you find a sick or injured animal, contact Animal Control at 336-641-5990.

• Avoid animals that show unnatural behavior. Wild animals are usually not friendly so be very careful when someone approaches you.

• Do not try to separate fighting animals.

• Feed your pets indoors. Leaving food outside will attract dogs, cats, and other wildlife into your yard.

The post Rabies raccoon found in Greensboro marks the fourth case of rabies in Guilford this year | Local first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623865935) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(84) "Here is today’s weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather" ["link"]=> string(109) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/here-is-todays-weather-forecast-for-june-16-2021-in-winston-salem-nc-weather/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 17:41:18 +0000" ["category"]=> string(13) "Winston-Salem" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8450" ["description"]=> string(1038) "
Here is today's weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC |  Weather

The forecast indicates a hot day in Winston Salem. The weather forecast calls for a mild 83 degrees. However, expect a drastic drop in temperature with a low of 57 degrees. Conditions today are expected to be clear, so there shouldn’t be too many clouds in the sky. The UV index is high today. The […]

The post Here is today's weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(1429) "
Here is today's weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC |  Weather

The forecast indicates a hot day in Winston Salem. The weather forecast calls for a mild 83 degrees. However, expect a drastic drop in temperature with a low of 57 degrees. Conditions today are expected to be clear, so there shouldn’t be too many clouds in the sky. The UV index is high today. The sun rays will be intense. If possible, stay in the shade. Wear sunglasses, a hat, and sunscreen when in sunlight. A light breeze should be blowing in the Winston Salem area, with forecast models showing only 9 mph wind conditions coming from the north. This report is automatically generated using weather data provided by TownNews.com. Visit journalnow.com for more weather updates.

The post Here is today's weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1038) "
Here is today's weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC |  Weather

The forecast indicates a hot day in Winston Salem. The weather forecast calls for a mild 83 degrees. However, expect a drastic drop in temperature with a low of 57 degrees. Conditions today are expected to be clear, so there shouldn’t be too many clouds in the sky. The UV index is high today. The […]

The post Here is today's weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(1429) "
Here is today's weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC |  Weather

The forecast indicates a hot day in Winston Salem. The weather forecast calls for a mild 83 degrees. However, expect a drastic drop in temperature with a low of 57 degrees. Conditions today are expected to be clear, so there shouldn’t be too many clouds in the sky. The UV index is high today. The sun rays will be intense. If possible, stay in the shade. Wear sunglasses, a hat, and sunscreen when in sunlight. A light breeze should be blowing in the Winston Salem area, with forecast models showing only 9 mph wind conditions coming from the north. This report is automatically generated using weather data provided by TownNews.com. Visit journalnow.com for more weather updates.

The post Here is today's weather forecast for June 16, 2021 in Winston-Salem, NC | Weather first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623865278) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(79) "State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn" ["link"]=> string(107) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/state-of-the-farm-6-16-21-cal-raleigh-noelvi-marte-carter-bins-travis-kuhn/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 17:18:49 +0000" ["category"]=> string(7) "Raleigh" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8447" ["description"]=> string(1525) "
State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn

The Mariners Player Dev Account recently tweeted a line-up for the AZL Mariners; However, according to the AZL website, the season won’t officially open until the 28th. Still, we can see how this team would theoretically position itself: Let’s see how things go in the meantime with the teams that are already in action. Transactions: […]

The post State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(12162) "
State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn

The Mariners Player Dev Account recently tweeted a line-up for the AZL Mariners; However, according to the AZL website, the season won’t officially open until the 28th. Still, we can see how this team would theoretically position itself:

Let’s see how things go in the meantime with the teams that are already in action.

Transactions:

Tacoma Rainiers (19-15) win shortened series against Sacramento River Cats (SFG) (14-21)

Braden Bishop is returning to Tacoma as a non-member of the Seattle Mariners and while I am delighted that Bra is moving closer to home and joining the same organization as his brother, seeing him in other team colors is still bittersweet. There weren’t many constant things about being a Mariners fan from 2015 until today, and Braden was one of those things, and his time as a Husky made the Bay Area product feel like a hometown boy. Sniff.

Game one: Rainiers lose 7-15

All that needs to be said about pitching here: Bullpen Day. Ian McKinney, come on. The offense got more than its fair share against the one-time Tyler Beede, who marked him for three runs in 2.2 innings, driven by a Torrens RBI single, a Jantzen Witte double, and a Dylan Moore solo home run; The offense playfully tried to rally in the bottom seventh after Tacoma pitching gave up eight runs in two innings, on a two-RBI double from Luis Torrens and an RBI single from José Marmolejos, aided by a solo shot from Witte in the watch out, but it just wasn’t enough for the hole the pitching rod had dug.

Game two: McCaughan gets back on track, Rainiers win 7-2

A week after Darren McCaughan surrendered five runs in five innings to the Salt Lake Bees, he was able to keep the RiverCats at bay and only surrender one six innings run while hitting two; his bullpen (Brian Schlitter, Jimmy Yacabonis, Aaron Fletcher) all tackled to give up just one run and hit three more over three innings. Meanwhile, the offense salted this out early, largely thanks to a triple homer from Evan White making a rehab start.

Also, funnily enough, Cal Raleigh was knocked out of the game with two outs in the ninth inning and the Rainiers were on the verge of a win; It’s the first time I’ve kicked Raleigh out, and I think the first time he got kicked out in his career, college, or work. The specifics don’t really matter (unless Eric Filia was also kicked out earlier along with manager Kristopher Negrón, so this was clearly an all-time topic for the night as Filia knows the zone as well as anyone else); It’s just pretty cool to see Cal, as sangfroid and diplomatic as can be, willing to risk a suspension to stand up for his pitchers and which is clearly right. It’s also a reminder that Cal Raleigh, raised to his full size, is quite a scary sight to see. No wonder Rob Marcello dragged him away by his chest protector like an idiosyncratic channel ride to get into dangerous waters.

Hey, I like Cal’s reaction, he protects his pitcher and his team, that pitch was in the middle, Cal showed that he is a leader and that his passion goes a long way. @ MiLBMariners https://t.co/ ixHQEzWe53

– Edgar Martinez (@ 11EdgarMartinez) June 12, 2021

Game three: Bullpen day, but to victory? 4-3

In a fun twist on the normally unhappy Bullpen Day, only two of Tacoma’s six pitchers gave up all runs; Meanwhile, Tacoma made a small ball on the first run and got three more solo shot HRs (Jarred Kelenic, Luis Torrens, and Ty Kelly) to do just enough to win this one.

Game four: postponed

Strange, but that’s also the same game that was postponed in the previous series against the Bees. This game will be rescheduled on July 25th.

Game five: Rainiers win! 5-1

A week after giving up four runs of ten hits over just four innings, Logan Verrett gave up just one run of six hits with five strikeouts, finishing nearly seven innings of work. The bullpen kept things under control, led by a sterling inning from Keynan Middleton, where it only took 13 pitches to pick up a 1-2-3 inning with two strikeouts, and the offense offered thanks to another multi-run HR from. more than enough Evan White, an HR from Kelenic, and doubles from Donovan Walton and Cal Raleigh, pushes his hit series into the “old enough to legally drink” category.

Game six: Tacoma takes a win in the series finals, 10-9

Again weird echoes from last week, although Tacoma was 7-0 behind this time. This time around, David Huff – he had six innings and one run last week – wasn’t as solid, gave up seven runs, earned six, and failed to take the third inning. Honor the bullpen who gave up just two more runs (both from Robert Duggar, recently opted to Tacoma) and the offense who just keeps slug, led by a three-hit tag from Jantzen Witte; Cal Raleigh also extended his hitting streak with a double on a two-day RBI.

Table update:

Tacoma enjoys a get-right series against the Division’s basement dwellers in the RiverCats, but stays where they were in OPS and all pitching categories; The Arkansas pitching team is unable to recover in the bouncy castle on Springfield’s home field; Everett crushes despite a nascent strikeout problem (not enough for pitchers, too many for batters); Modesto slips into a competitive low-A west.

Triple-A-Tacoma:

Team record: 19-15 (.559), 2nd of 5 in Triple-A West – West

4th of 10 in Triple-A West in OPS (.849)

5.22 ERA (4th in Triple-A West), 1.42 WHIP (3rd), 352 Ks (T-3rd)

Double-A Arkansas:

Team record: 17-19 (.472), 3rd of 5 in double-A middle-north

.712 OPS (6th of 10 in Double-A Central)

4.08 AGE (4th), 1.40 WHIP (7th), 345 Ks (6th)

High-A-Everett:

Team record: 22-13 (.629), 1st of 6 in High-A West

.829 OPS (2nd place = Eugene, at .704)

3.47 ERA (1st), 1.23 WHIP (1st), 385 Ks (3rd)

Run difference: +102

Low-A-Modesto:

Team record: 21-16 (.568), 3rd of 4 in Low-A West-North

.751 OPS (3.)

4.11 ERA (4th), 1.52 WHIP (7th), 448 Ks (2nd)

Leaderboard:

Doughs:

wRC +: Carter container (A +), 182

Average: Cal Raleigh, .357

Personnel Department: TIE, Jake Scheiner and Brian O’Keefe (AA) and Noelvi Marte (A), Aug.

BB / K: Victor Labrada (A), 0.91

Hits: Noelvi Marte, 45

Jugs:

ERA (min. 25 IP): Tyler Herb (AA), 2.03

ERA, relief: Leon Hunter Jr. (A), .052

FIP (at least 25 IP): Taylor-Dollard (A), 1.93

K%: Brandon Williamson (A +), 50%

Strikethroughs: TIE, Brandon Williamson and Taylor Dollard, 51

K-BB%: Brandon Williamson, 43.1%

Stores: Therein Gillies (AA), 5

interested persons

I talked about Cal Raleigh last week; his hitting streak has only grown to over 20 games since then. It has an ISO over .300 and is toying with a single-digit strike rate (currently 12%). He has an OPS (1,060) higher than Angel’s superprospect Jo Adell (1,018) and he plays his home games in a much more offensive neutral park while he is a catcher. Speaking of which, he also beats Supercatch prospect Joey Bart – remember, the Joey Bart who made the top 100 lists while Cal was forgotten – on the tune of a 157 wRC + vs Bart only goes 5, 5% of the time while canceling almost a third of the time. It’s so crazy and adorable and while I want him to be called to Seattle, I also want to see if Cal can break a 300 WRC + at some point. In this week’s Midshipmen’s Log, I talked about Noelvi Marte; He’s improving his 2019 MVP season and tearing the blanket off Modesto. Instead, this week you’ll get two “names to get to know”:

Names You Should Know:

C Carter container, A +

To get this out of the way, Bins hits harder at High-A than you’d hope for from a polished college bat (Fresno State, 2019), a little over a third of the time, but also when you consider that he didn’t. In order not to receive any of the special additional developments that the Mariners gave their top perspectives during the pandemic, we can highlight a little too much as a tidbit when there are almost as many with a .275 ISO and 6 HR as there are after its design year twice as many record appearances. Especially when that comes with a solid defense behind the bowl, oh yeah, especially then.

RHRP Travis Ray Kuhn, A

Kuhn, a 19th King in 2019 from San Diego, is a little king who loves punching tickets. He wasn’t invited to do anything with the Mariners during the pandemic, so he spent his time at home in Cali filling in every inch of his five-foot-tall body and throwing it as hard as possible. Kuhn has yet to refine his command to further those comparisons with Dan Altavilla, another short and muscular Hartmann with command issues, but he apparently got the closer job at Modesto, which alone would make him worth watching if his impeccable personal style were wasn’t enough for you.

The post State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1525) "
State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn

The Mariners Player Dev Account recently tweeted a line-up for the AZL Mariners; However, according to the AZL website, the season won’t officially open until the 28th. Still, we can see how this team would theoretically position itself: Let’s see how things go in the meantime with the teams that are already in action. Transactions: […]

The post State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(12162) "
State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn

The Mariners Player Dev Account recently tweeted a line-up for the AZL Mariners; However, according to the AZL website, the season won’t officially open until the 28th. Still, we can see how this team would theoretically position itself:

Let’s see how things go in the meantime with the teams that are already in action.

Transactions:

Tacoma Rainiers (19-15) win shortened series against Sacramento River Cats (SFG) (14-21)

Braden Bishop is returning to Tacoma as a non-member of the Seattle Mariners and while I am delighted that Bra is moving closer to home and joining the same organization as his brother, seeing him in other team colors is still bittersweet. There weren’t many constant things about being a Mariners fan from 2015 until today, and Braden was one of those things, and his time as a Husky made the Bay Area product feel like a hometown boy. Sniff.

Game one: Rainiers lose 7-15

All that needs to be said about pitching here: Bullpen Day. Ian McKinney, come on. The offense got more than its fair share against the one-time Tyler Beede, who marked him for three runs in 2.2 innings, driven by a Torrens RBI single, a Jantzen Witte double, and a Dylan Moore solo home run; The offense playfully tried to rally in the bottom seventh after Tacoma pitching gave up eight runs in two innings, on a two-RBI double from Luis Torrens and an RBI single from José Marmolejos, aided by a solo shot from Witte in the watch out, but it just wasn’t enough for the hole the pitching rod had dug.

Game two: McCaughan gets back on track, Rainiers win 7-2

A week after Darren McCaughan surrendered five runs in five innings to the Salt Lake Bees, he was able to keep the RiverCats at bay and only surrender one six innings run while hitting two; his bullpen (Brian Schlitter, Jimmy Yacabonis, Aaron Fletcher) all tackled to give up just one run and hit three more over three innings. Meanwhile, the offense salted this out early, largely thanks to a triple homer from Evan White making a rehab start.

Also, funnily enough, Cal Raleigh was knocked out of the game with two outs in the ninth inning and the Rainiers were on the verge of a win; It’s the first time I’ve kicked Raleigh out, and I think the first time he got kicked out in his career, college, or work. The specifics don’t really matter (unless Eric Filia was also kicked out earlier along with manager Kristopher Negrón, so this was clearly an all-time topic for the night as Filia knows the zone as well as anyone else); It’s just pretty cool to see Cal, as sangfroid and diplomatic as can be, willing to risk a suspension to stand up for his pitchers and which is clearly right. It’s also a reminder that Cal Raleigh, raised to his full size, is quite a scary sight to see. No wonder Rob Marcello dragged him away by his chest protector like an idiosyncratic channel ride to get into dangerous waters.

Hey, I like Cal’s reaction, he protects his pitcher and his team, that pitch was in the middle, Cal showed that he is a leader and that his passion goes a long way. @ MiLBMariners https://t.co/ ixHQEzWe53

– Edgar Martinez (@ 11EdgarMartinez) June 12, 2021

Game three: Bullpen day, but to victory? 4-3

In a fun twist on the normally unhappy Bullpen Day, only two of Tacoma’s six pitchers gave up all runs; Meanwhile, Tacoma made a small ball on the first run and got three more solo shot HRs (Jarred Kelenic, Luis Torrens, and Ty Kelly) to do just enough to win this one.

Game four: postponed

Strange, but that’s also the same game that was postponed in the previous series against the Bees. This game will be rescheduled on July 25th.

Game five: Rainiers win! 5-1

A week after giving up four runs of ten hits over just four innings, Logan Verrett gave up just one run of six hits with five strikeouts, finishing nearly seven innings of work. The bullpen kept things under control, led by a sterling inning from Keynan Middleton, where it only took 13 pitches to pick up a 1-2-3 inning with two strikeouts, and the offense offered thanks to another multi-run HR from. more than enough Evan White, an HR from Kelenic, and doubles from Donovan Walton and Cal Raleigh, pushes his hit series into the “old enough to legally drink” category.

Game six: Tacoma takes a win in the series finals, 10-9

Again weird echoes from last week, although Tacoma was 7-0 behind this time. This time around, David Huff – he had six innings and one run last week – wasn’t as solid, gave up seven runs, earned six, and failed to take the third inning. Honor the bullpen who gave up just two more runs (both from Robert Duggar, recently opted to Tacoma) and the offense who just keeps slug, led by a three-hit tag from Jantzen Witte; Cal Raleigh also extended his hitting streak with a double on a two-day RBI.

Table update:

Tacoma enjoys a get-right series against the Division’s basement dwellers in the RiverCats, but stays where they were in OPS and all pitching categories; The Arkansas pitching team is unable to recover in the bouncy castle on Springfield’s home field; Everett crushes despite a nascent strikeout problem (not enough for pitchers, too many for batters); Modesto slips into a competitive low-A west.

Triple-A-Tacoma:

Team record: 19-15 (.559), 2nd of 5 in Triple-A West – West

4th of 10 in Triple-A West in OPS (.849)

5.22 ERA (4th in Triple-A West), 1.42 WHIP (3rd), 352 Ks (T-3rd)

Double-A Arkansas:

Team record: 17-19 (.472), 3rd of 5 in double-A middle-north

.712 OPS (6th of 10 in Double-A Central)

4.08 AGE (4th), 1.40 WHIP (7th), 345 Ks (6th)

High-A-Everett:

Team record: 22-13 (.629), 1st of 6 in High-A West

.829 OPS (2nd place = Eugene, at .704)

3.47 ERA (1st), 1.23 WHIP (1st), 385 Ks (3rd)

Run difference: +102

Low-A-Modesto:

Team record: 21-16 (.568), 3rd of 4 in Low-A West-North

.751 OPS (3.)

4.11 ERA (4th), 1.52 WHIP (7th), 448 Ks (2nd)

Leaderboard:

Doughs:

wRC +: Carter container (A +), 182

Average: Cal Raleigh, .357

Personnel Department: TIE, Jake Scheiner and Brian O’Keefe (AA) and Noelvi Marte (A), Aug.

BB / K: Victor Labrada (A), 0.91

Hits: Noelvi Marte, 45

Jugs:

ERA (min. 25 IP): Tyler Herb (AA), 2.03

ERA, relief: Leon Hunter Jr. (A), .052

FIP (at least 25 IP): Taylor-Dollard (A), 1.93

K%: Brandon Williamson (A +), 50%

Strikethroughs: TIE, Brandon Williamson and Taylor Dollard, 51

K-BB%: Brandon Williamson, 43.1%

Stores: Therein Gillies (AA), 5

interested persons

I talked about Cal Raleigh last week; his hitting streak has only grown to over 20 games since then. It has an ISO over .300 and is toying with a single-digit strike rate (currently 12%). He has an OPS (1,060) higher than Angel’s superprospect Jo Adell (1,018) and he plays his home games in a much more offensive neutral park while he is a catcher. Speaking of which, he also beats Supercatch prospect Joey Bart – remember, the Joey Bart who made the top 100 lists while Cal was forgotten – on the tune of a 157 wRC + vs Bart only goes 5, 5% of the time while canceling almost a third of the time. It’s so crazy and adorable and while I want him to be called to Seattle, I also want to see if Cal can break a 300 WRC + at some point. In this week’s Midshipmen’s Log, I talked about Noelvi Marte; He’s improving his 2019 MVP season and tearing the blanket off Modesto. Instead, this week you’ll get two “names to get to know”:

Names You Should Know:

C Carter container, A +

To get this out of the way, Bins hits harder at High-A than you’d hope for from a polished college bat (Fresno State, 2019), a little over a third of the time, but also when you consider that he didn’t. In order not to receive any of the special additional developments that the Mariners gave their top perspectives during the pandemic, we can highlight a little too much as a tidbit when there are almost as many with a .275 ISO and 6 HR as there are after its design year twice as many record appearances. Especially when that comes with a solid defense behind the bowl, oh yeah, especially then.

RHRP Travis Ray Kuhn, A

Kuhn, a 19th King in 2019 from San Diego, is a little king who loves punching tickets. He wasn’t invited to do anything with the Mariners during the pandemic, so he spent his time at home in Cali filling in every inch of his five-foot-tall body and throwing it as hard as possible. Kuhn has yet to refine his command to further those comparisons with Dan Altavilla, another short and muscular Hartmann with command issues, but he apparently got the closer job at Modesto, which alone would make him worth watching if his impeccable personal style were wasn’t enough for you.

The post State of the farm, 6/16/21: Cal Raleigh, Noelvi Marte, Carter Bins, Travis Kuhn first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623863929) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(58) "Search for “armed and dangerous” murder suspects: CMPD" ["link"]=> string(84) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/search-for-armed-and-dangerous-murder-suspects-cmpd/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 17:01:33 +0000" ["category"]=> string(9) "Charlotte" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8444" ["description"]=> string(1277) "
Kimberly Johnson's profile picture

CHARLOTTE, NC – Police are calling for help from the community in locating a man allegedly wanted in connection with the murder of a 34-year-old man who was fatally shot outside a lounge in north Charlotte early Saturday morning. Cordero Emanuel Ardrey, 33, is wanted for the murder of Horace McCorey (34), the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police […]

The post Search for "armed and dangerous" murder suspects: CMPD first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2269) "
Kimberly Johnson's profile picture

CHARLOTTE, NC – Police are calling for help from the community in locating a man allegedly wanted in connection with the murder of a 34-year-old man who was fatally shot outside a lounge in north Charlotte early Saturday morning.

Cordero Emanuel Ardrey, 33, is wanted for the murder of Horace McCorey (34), the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police said.

“Ardrey should be viewed as armed and dangerous,” said CMPD. “Anyone who sees Ardrey or knows his whereabouts is asked to call 9-1-1 immediately.”

According to a CMPD account, McCorey was shot multiple times and sustained life-threatening injuries outside Mooney’s Lounge on 2525 North Graham Street around 4 a.m. early Saturday morning. Then he drove himself to 11 Charlotte Fire Department Station, located at 620 West 28th Street, where he crashed into the fire department garage door.

“Upon arrival at the scene, the firefighters immediately began treating the victim, and firefighters and paramedics transported the victim to the Main Atrium,” said CMPD.

On Monday, CMPD said McCorey’s family had been informed of his death.

CMPD said an investigation into the case is still active and ongoing and anyone with information about the case will be asked to call Crime Stoppers at 704-334-1600.

The post Search for "armed and dangerous" murder suspects: CMPD first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1277) "
Kimberly Johnson's profile picture

CHARLOTTE, NC – Police are calling for help from the community in locating a man allegedly wanted in connection with the murder of a 34-year-old man who was fatally shot outside a lounge in north Charlotte early Saturday morning. Cordero Emanuel Ardrey, 33, is wanted for the murder of Horace McCorey (34), the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police […]

The post Search for "armed and dangerous" murder suspects: CMPD first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2269) "
Kimberly Johnson's profile picture

CHARLOTTE, NC – Police are calling for help from the community in locating a man allegedly wanted in connection with the murder of a 34-year-old man who was fatally shot outside a lounge in north Charlotte early Saturday morning.

Cordero Emanuel Ardrey, 33, is wanted for the murder of Horace McCorey (34), the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police said.

“Ardrey should be viewed as armed and dangerous,” said CMPD. “Anyone who sees Ardrey or knows his whereabouts is asked to call 9-1-1 immediately.”

According to a CMPD account, McCorey was shot multiple times and sustained life-threatening injuries outside Mooney’s Lounge on 2525 North Graham Street around 4 a.m. early Saturday morning. Then he drove himself to 11 Charlotte Fire Department Station, located at 620 West 28th Street, where he crashed into the fire department garage door.

“Upon arrival at the scene, the firefighters immediately began treating the victim, and firefighters and paramedics transported the victim to the Main Atrium,” said CMPD.

On Monday, CMPD said McCorey’s family had been informed of his death.

CMPD said an investigation into the case is still active and ongoing and anyone with information about the case will be asked to call Crime Stoppers at 704-334-1600.

The post Search for "armed and dangerous" murder suspects: CMPD first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623862893) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(114) "Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday evening, police say | Crime news" ["link"]=> string(143) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/moped-driver-stabbed-to-death-after-being-hit-by-a-vehicle-in-greensboro-tuesday-evening-police-say-crime-news/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 13:51:40 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8440" ["description"]=> string(1635) "
Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday night, police say |  Crime news

GREENSBORO – A man was stabbed to death Tuesday night after a vehicle hit his moped along Glenwood Avenue, according to a Greensboro Police press release. Police were called at 7.45 p.m. Tuesday after a man driving a gold-colored limousine hit a man on a moped and stabbed him on the 1700 block of Glenwood […]

The post Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday evening, police say | Crime news first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2100) "
Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday night, police say |  Crime news

GREENSBORO – A man was stabbed to death Tuesday night after a vehicle hit his moped along Glenwood Avenue, according to a Greensboro Police press release.

Police were called at 7.45 p.m. Tuesday after a man driving a gold-colored limousine hit a man on a moped and stabbed him on the 1700 block of Glenwood Avenue, the statement said.

An ambulance took the man to a local hospital for treatment for stab wounds that police said did not appear to be life-threatening.

The police are asking anyone with information to call Greensboro / Guilford Crime Stoppers at 336-373-1000; or download the P3tips mobile app for Apple or Android phones to submit a mobile tip, or go to P3tips.org to submit a web tip. All Crime Stoppers tips are completely anonymous.

The post Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday evening, police say | Crime news first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1635) "
Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday night, police say |  Crime news

GREENSBORO – A man was stabbed to death Tuesday night after a vehicle hit his moped along Glenwood Avenue, according to a Greensboro Police press release. Police were called at 7.45 p.m. Tuesday after a man driving a gold-colored limousine hit a man on a moped and stabbed him on the 1700 block of Glenwood […]

The post Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday evening, police say | Crime news first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2100) "
Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday night, police say |  Crime news

GREENSBORO – A man was stabbed to death Tuesday night after a vehicle hit his moped along Glenwood Avenue, according to a Greensboro Police press release.

Police were called at 7.45 p.m. Tuesday after a man driving a gold-colored limousine hit a man on a moped and stabbed him on the 1700 block of Glenwood Avenue, the statement said.

An ambulance took the man to a local hospital for treatment for stab wounds that police said did not appear to be life-threatening.

The police are asking anyone with information to call Greensboro / Guilford Crime Stoppers at 336-373-1000; or download the P3tips mobile app for Apple or Android phones to submit a mobile tip, or go to P3tips.org to submit a web tip. All Crime Stoppers tips are completely anonymous.

The post Moped driver stabbed to death after being hit by a vehicle in Greensboro Tuesday evening, police say | Crime news first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623851500) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(101) "Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations" ["link"]=> string(133) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/voices-black-people-in-durham-remember-juniteenth-as-a-transfer-of-black-power-to-future-generations/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 10:12:35 +0000" ["category"]=> string(6) "Durham" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8437" ["description"]=> string(1751) "
Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations

I noticed the new white people Everyone in my neighborhood seems to have big dogs. Despite the harmlessness of “Fido” or “Trixie”, the owner does not warn that subtly. The brand new two meter high wall-like fence in her garden isn’t neighborly either. For me it’s a physical and cultural offense. Cutting open veranda flags […]

The post Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7915) "
Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations

I noticed the new white people Everyone in my neighborhood seems to have big dogs. Despite the harmlessness of “Fido” or “Trixie”, the owner does not warn that subtly. The brand new two meter high wall-like fence in her garden isn’t neighborly either. For me it’s a physical and cultural offense.

Cutting open veranda flags everywhere smells like another colonial practice of the settlers. This is the landscape I navigate as I hand out Juneteenth leaflets to my black neighbors.

The feeling of being overwhelmed by whiteness extends well beyond my neighborhood. Last month my mother came to see me from the northeast. It had been several years but we went to Durham Farmers Market to buy chow chow, goat cheese, and banana butter. The demographics of the city’s recent population boom was evident this early Saturday morning. While many of the salespeople were the same, I missed the Black family who sold mini cakes and hand pies. And I noticed that the majority of the black vendors were stationed on the edge of the main market square. What surprised me most was the overwhelming number of white 30-year-olds with infants and toddlers in tow.

While we were happy to support local black and white sellers, Mom and I didn’t stay long. When we were leaving I said to a friend on the phone: “Girls, there are hardly any black people here.”

I no longer whisper these truths.

An elderly white person came up to me after hearing my comment. “Well,” they told me, “tomorrow is a Black Farmers Market in Raleigh.”

Apparently well-meaning whites are so proud of themselves and want to share their knowledge of blacks with me.

“There are actually a lot of black people here,” they added.

I was so much kinder in that moment than I wanted to be.

“Well, these two of the five blacks here are leaving,” I told them.

How is it that there are fewer black-owned businesses in the city center than there were before the city was revitalized?

When I moved to Durham in 2003, the town center was mostly black-owned companies. In addition to the bank and the post office, I mainly visited Mr. Scott’s one-room tailoring, the Ethiopian convenience store, the Mr. Show clothing store on Main Street, the Talk of the Town nightclub, a Kenyan restaurant in Five Points, Mad Stylz Barbershop and of course Ronny Sturdivants TQ Business Complex.

White and black people in Raleigh were afraid to visit Durham, even in daylight. Back then, blacks made up 43 percent of the population. Our presence in Durham has been dwindling since 2010. And yet, for me, a white person quantifies, without being asked, how many blacks are “enough”.

There is an inverse relationship between whites ‘wellbeing and blacks’ access to public space. We might as well be living in the 1950s again. White people continue to take up so much space. And unfortunately, racial equality education has given many of them the language, resources, and right to expand who and what they can control.

I am guilty too. Since 2012, my social entrepreneurship – Whistle Stop Tours – has taken more than 100 groups through black neighborhoods. I love sharing Durham’s story with Black family gatherings and rites of passage groups. But most of my engagements are for undergraduate classes at PWIs (Predominantly White Institutions), non-profit retreats, corporate orientations, and research projects given by private schools.

“There is an inverse relationship between whites ‘wellbeing and blacks’ access to public space.”

In the past 10 years I have seen heritage tourism becoming profitable for everyone but the city’s most vulnerable residents. I don’t blame anyone for wanting to understand their story. But large groups of whites traveling through black neighborhoods are mostly another hallmark of gentrification.

My employer, Village of Wisdom, cooperates with the Hayti Heritage Center every year for the Juniteenth. The evolution of the Heritage Center from a “brush dome” – a place of worship – to an African Methodist Episcopal Church, Freedman’s School, a place for civil rights organization and now a performance hall and cultural center still bears the name of the first free blacks Republic in the Western Hemisphere. The island nation of Haiti is a global symbol for black liberation. The Creole or Kreyol spelling of Ayiti (translated into English as “mountainous land”) is a recognition of the indigenous Taino people, whose population was almost exterminated by Spanish invaders in the 16th century.

Hayti’s descendants opposed a similar colonial settler practice known as urban renewal. In 1975, St. Joseph’s AME prevented demolition and was listed on the North Carolina Register of Historic Places.

Blacks need our own rooms. Segregation forced the creation of many counties such as Hayti, Wilmington and Greenwood, which nonetheless flourished until they became the target of racial violence, and the country’s interstate highway system that tore through the heart of these communities.

Black holidays like Juneteenth in Durham and across the country are our time to get back together. It’s a time to pay homage to the Occaneechi band of the Saponi nation, whose land became an open haven for African Americans during the Jim Crow Terror. It’s a time to rest from the work of code switching. We look forward to enjoying special spaces away from the white gaze, oasis spaces where we can express ourselves through our eating habits, musical genius, remixed dance styles and fashion, while reminding ourselves that there is history and legacy in everything black .

This June tenth I decided to fly the red, black and green flag of liberation in my garden. It is more out of a sense of duty than joy or pride. I am reminded that sharing our history is also a transfer of black power to future generations.

AYA SHABU is Assistant Director of Arts and Culture at the Village of Wisdom and curator of the June 18th Celebration at the Hayti Heritage Center. Comment on this column at backtalk@indyweek.com.

Voices is made possible through contributions to the INDY Press Club. Join today.

The post Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1751) "
Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations

I noticed the new white people Everyone in my neighborhood seems to have big dogs. Despite the harmlessness of “Fido” or “Trixie”, the owner does not warn that subtly. The brand new two meter high wall-like fence in her garden isn’t neighborly either. For me it’s a physical and cultural offense. Cutting open veranda flags […]

The post Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(7915) "
Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations

I noticed the new white people Everyone in my neighborhood seems to have big dogs. Despite the harmlessness of “Fido” or “Trixie”, the owner does not warn that subtly. The brand new two meter high wall-like fence in her garden isn’t neighborly either. For me it’s a physical and cultural offense.

Cutting open veranda flags everywhere smells like another colonial practice of the settlers. This is the landscape I navigate as I hand out Juneteenth leaflets to my black neighbors.

The feeling of being overwhelmed by whiteness extends well beyond my neighborhood. Last month my mother came to see me from the northeast. It had been several years but we went to Durham Farmers Market to buy chow chow, goat cheese, and banana butter. The demographics of the city’s recent population boom was evident this early Saturday morning. While many of the salespeople were the same, I missed the Black family who sold mini cakes and hand pies. And I noticed that the majority of the black vendors were stationed on the edge of the main market square. What surprised me most was the overwhelming number of white 30-year-olds with infants and toddlers in tow.

While we were happy to support local black and white sellers, Mom and I didn’t stay long. When we were leaving I said to a friend on the phone: “Girls, there are hardly any black people here.”

I no longer whisper these truths.

An elderly white person came up to me after hearing my comment. “Well,” they told me, “tomorrow is a Black Farmers Market in Raleigh.”

Apparently well-meaning whites are so proud of themselves and want to share their knowledge of blacks with me.

“There are actually a lot of black people here,” they added.

I was so much kinder in that moment than I wanted to be.

“Well, these two of the five blacks here are leaving,” I told them.

How is it that there are fewer black-owned businesses in the city center than there were before the city was revitalized?

When I moved to Durham in 2003, the town center was mostly black-owned companies. In addition to the bank and the post office, I mainly visited Mr. Scott’s one-room tailoring, the Ethiopian convenience store, the Mr. Show clothing store on Main Street, the Talk of the Town nightclub, a Kenyan restaurant in Five Points, Mad Stylz Barbershop and of course Ronny Sturdivants TQ Business Complex.

White and black people in Raleigh were afraid to visit Durham, even in daylight. Back then, blacks made up 43 percent of the population. Our presence in Durham has been dwindling since 2010. And yet, for me, a white person quantifies, without being asked, how many blacks are “enough”.

There is an inverse relationship between whites ‘wellbeing and blacks’ access to public space. We might as well be living in the 1950s again. White people continue to take up so much space. And unfortunately, racial equality education has given many of them the language, resources, and right to expand who and what they can control.

I am guilty too. Since 2012, my social entrepreneurship – Whistle Stop Tours – has taken more than 100 groups through black neighborhoods. I love sharing Durham’s story with Black family gatherings and rites of passage groups. But most of my engagements are for undergraduate classes at PWIs (Predominantly White Institutions), non-profit retreats, corporate orientations, and research projects given by private schools.

“There is an inverse relationship between whites ‘wellbeing and blacks’ access to public space.”

In the past 10 years I have seen heritage tourism becoming profitable for everyone but the city’s most vulnerable residents. I don’t blame anyone for wanting to understand their story. But large groups of whites traveling through black neighborhoods are mostly another hallmark of gentrification.

My employer, Village of Wisdom, cooperates with the Hayti Heritage Center every year for the Juniteenth. The evolution of the Heritage Center from a “brush dome” – a place of worship – to an African Methodist Episcopal Church, Freedman’s School, a place for civil rights organization and now a performance hall and cultural center still bears the name of the first free blacks Republic in the Western Hemisphere. The island nation of Haiti is a global symbol for black liberation. The Creole or Kreyol spelling of Ayiti (translated into English as “mountainous land”) is a recognition of the indigenous Taino people, whose population was almost exterminated by Spanish invaders in the 16th century.

Hayti’s descendants opposed a similar colonial settler practice known as urban renewal. In 1975, St. Joseph’s AME prevented demolition and was listed on the North Carolina Register of Historic Places.

Blacks need our own rooms. Segregation forced the creation of many counties such as Hayti, Wilmington and Greenwood, which nonetheless flourished until they became the target of racial violence, and the country’s interstate highway system that tore through the heart of these communities.

Black holidays like Juneteenth in Durham and across the country are our time to get back together. It’s a time to pay homage to the Occaneechi band of the Saponi nation, whose land became an open haven for African Americans during the Jim Crow Terror. It’s a time to rest from the work of code switching. We look forward to enjoying special spaces away from the white gaze, oasis spaces where we can express ourselves through our eating habits, musical genius, remixed dance styles and fashion, while reminding ourselves that there is history and legacy in everything black .

This June tenth I decided to fly the red, black and green flag of liberation in my garden. It is more out of a sense of duty than joy or pride. I am reminded that sharing our history is also a transfer of black power to future generations.

AYA SHABU is Assistant Director of Arts and Culture at the Village of Wisdom and curator of the June 18th Celebration at the Hayti Heritage Center. Comment on this column at backtalk@indyweek.com.

Voices is made possible through contributions to the INDY Press Club. Join today.

The post Voices: Black people in Durham remember Juniteenth as a transfer of black power to future generations first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623838355) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(89) "Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes" ["link"]=> string(122) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/renters-of-affordable-housing-in-southeast-raleigh-are-concerned-about-losing-their-homes/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Wed, 16 Jun 2021 10:11:10 +0000" ["category"]=> string(7) "Raleigh" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8434" ["description"]=> string(1695) "
Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes

James Upchurch lived in the Wayside Apartments eight years on Garner Road in Raleigh. The complex, located a few kilometers south of the city center, has served many low-income residents as affordable housing for decades. But this month could be the last of Upchurch and the rest of the residents. In mid-May, residents received a […]

The post Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7141) "
Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes

James Upchurch lived in the Wayside Apartments eight years on Garner Road in Raleigh. The complex, located a few kilometers south of the city center, has served many low-income residents as affordable housing for decades.

But this month could be the last of Upchurch and the rest of the residents.

In mid-May, residents received a door notification that the complex had been sold and the new landlords would terminate all leases effective late June, leaving Upchurch and dozens of others to worry about the housing. Since Raleigh’s average monthly rent for a 956-square-foot apartment is estimated at $ 1,287 – a 57 percent increase since 2010, according to the RENTCafé housing exchange – Wayside tenants petitioned to extend the notice period their apartment asked.

“There are 32 families here that are being displaced,” says Upchurch. “So a couple of them have already found something. But I’m a disabled person, so I can’t get around and we’re waiting to find something. “

The petition was sent to TradeMark Residential, a housing management company working for the new owner of the complex, shortly after residents received the notices. Since then, many residents have contacted Raleigh City Council and local activists for help.

Diana Powell, executive director of Justice Served NC, says Upchurch contacted her about two weeks ago, shortly after receiving his rental notice.

“This is the part where we have to come in and work with our funded resources and the community, and that’s what we’re trying to do,” says Powell. “When individuals are totally unsupported, nowhere, no family, no couch, nowhere, then we as a community and these other programs have to get together and find out.”

While tenants may be able to reapply for an apartment in the renovated apartment complex, Powell says, many of the new landlords’ new requirements are difficult for current residents to meet. For example, the rent is to be tripled, and in addition to an application fee, background and credit checks will now also be part of the application process.

“I would say that 80 percent probably can’t go on living there,” says Powell. “Your options are simply to look elsewhere or become homeless.”

Speaking to the INDY, Upchurch said that while he could afford the higher rent, he couldn’t afford anything else. With the lease soon expiring, Upchurch contacted Corey Branch, Raleigh City Council representative for District C, where the apartment complex is located.

“I have a feeling he’s trying, and they’re telling us they’re talking to the mayor,” says Upchurch. “I just have to carry on with what they tell us. Each of us just has to continue what we tell us to do. “

Branch says he had contact with several residents of the Garner Road apartment complex as well as TradeMark Residential. Branch told INDY that the new landlords are working to extend the rental period for current residents. But residents continue to face challenges as Raleigh’s housing market has become not only more expensive but also more competitive.

“Right now, with the very low vacancy rate in the county, it’s really difficult to find a place for everyone,” says Branch. “There are a lot of competing factors for someone moving here looking for a place, so I think about this situation, but my overall goal is to work with the residents to keep them there.”

Ed Batchelor, president of TradeMark Residential, told INDY that the management company is working with the Raleigh / Wake partnership to end homelessness in order to help current residents find homes after the rental period expires. Batchelor also confirmed that he worked with Branch and the Raleigh City Council to find ways to accommodate the residents.

To combat the housing crisis, Branch said the city council is working on several affordable housing projects, including increasing the Raleigh property tax to cover the upcoming construction of affordable housing. However, it takes months to build these complexes, Branch says. With North Carolina’s minimum wage still at $ 7.25 an hour and the housing market expected to become more competitive in the coming years, many residents find the city of Oaks increasingly unaffordable.

“We need more landlords who are willing not to go at market prices, who are willing to say, ‘Hey, I can take a little less because I’m helping someone and that person is consistent with their payments,'” says Branch. “There are many people who are willing to pay and are willing to pay all the time, but they cannot afford the speed at which things are going or increasing.”

The June deadline for residents will likely be extended by a few more months, according to Branch and Powell. But residents who cannot meet the new housing requirements now have to find replacement plans for the living space – and quickly.

For many, this means finding family, friends, or community groups with space to temporarily reside, Powell told the INDY.

He and his family have not yet been able to find concrete housing plans for Upchurch.

“There are only three of us left,” says Upchurch. “One lives in Richmond and I’m here.”

Comment on this story at backtalk@indyweek.com.

Support independent local journalism. Join the INDY Press Club to help keep fearless Guardian coverage and critical arts and culture coverage in the triangle workable.

The post Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1695) "
Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes

James Upchurch lived in the Wayside Apartments eight years on Garner Road in Raleigh. The complex, located a few kilometers south of the city center, has served many low-income residents as affordable housing for decades. But this month could be the last of Upchurch and the rest of the residents. In mid-May, residents received a […]

The post Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(7141) "
Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes

James Upchurch lived in the Wayside Apartments eight years on Garner Road in Raleigh. The complex, located a few kilometers south of the city center, has served many low-income residents as affordable housing for decades.

But this month could be the last of Upchurch and the rest of the residents.

In mid-May, residents received a door notification that the complex had been sold and the new landlords would terminate all leases effective late June, leaving Upchurch and dozens of others to worry about the housing. Since Raleigh’s average monthly rent for a 956-square-foot apartment is estimated at $ 1,287 – a 57 percent increase since 2010, according to the RENTCafé housing exchange – Wayside tenants petitioned to extend the notice period their apartment asked.

“There are 32 families here that are being displaced,” says Upchurch. “So a couple of them have already found something. But I’m a disabled person, so I can’t get around and we’re waiting to find something. “

The petition was sent to TradeMark Residential, a housing management company working for the new owner of the complex, shortly after residents received the notices. Since then, many residents have contacted Raleigh City Council and local activists for help.

Diana Powell, executive director of Justice Served NC, says Upchurch contacted her about two weeks ago, shortly after receiving his rental notice.

“This is the part where we have to come in and work with our funded resources and the community, and that’s what we’re trying to do,” says Powell. “When individuals are totally unsupported, nowhere, no family, no couch, nowhere, then we as a community and these other programs have to get together and find out.”

While tenants may be able to reapply for an apartment in the renovated apartment complex, Powell says, many of the new landlords’ new requirements are difficult for current residents to meet. For example, the rent is to be tripled, and in addition to an application fee, background and credit checks will now also be part of the application process.

“I would say that 80 percent probably can’t go on living there,” says Powell. “Your options are simply to look elsewhere or become homeless.”

Speaking to the INDY, Upchurch said that while he could afford the higher rent, he couldn’t afford anything else. With the lease soon expiring, Upchurch contacted Corey Branch, Raleigh City Council representative for District C, where the apartment complex is located.

“I have a feeling he’s trying, and they’re telling us they’re talking to the mayor,” says Upchurch. “I just have to carry on with what they tell us. Each of us just has to continue what we tell us to do. “

Branch says he had contact with several residents of the Garner Road apartment complex as well as TradeMark Residential. Branch told INDY that the new landlords are working to extend the rental period for current residents. But residents continue to face challenges as Raleigh’s housing market has become not only more expensive but also more competitive.

“Right now, with the very low vacancy rate in the county, it’s really difficult to find a place for everyone,” says Branch. “There are a lot of competing factors for someone moving here looking for a place, so I think about this situation, but my overall goal is to work with the residents to keep them there.”

Ed Batchelor, president of TradeMark Residential, told INDY that the management company is working with the Raleigh / Wake partnership to end homelessness in order to help current residents find homes after the rental period expires. Batchelor also confirmed that he worked with Branch and the Raleigh City Council to find ways to accommodate the residents.

To combat the housing crisis, Branch said the city council is working on several affordable housing projects, including increasing the Raleigh property tax to cover the upcoming construction of affordable housing. However, it takes months to build these complexes, Branch says. With North Carolina’s minimum wage still at $ 7.25 an hour and the housing market expected to become more competitive in the coming years, many residents find the city of Oaks increasingly unaffordable.

“We need more landlords who are willing not to go at market prices, who are willing to say, ‘Hey, I can take a little less because I’m helping someone and that person is consistent with their payments,'” says Branch. “There are many people who are willing to pay and are willing to pay all the time, but they cannot afford the speed at which things are going or increasing.”

The June deadline for residents will likely be extended by a few more months, according to Branch and Powell. But residents who cannot meet the new housing requirements now have to find replacement plans for the living space – and quickly.

For many, this means finding family, friends, or community groups with space to temporarily reside, Powell told the INDY.

He and his family have not yet been able to find concrete housing plans for Upchurch.

“There are only three of us left,” says Upchurch. “One lives in Richmond and I’m here.”

Comment on this story at backtalk@indyweek.com.

Support independent local journalism. Join the INDY Press Club to help keep fearless Guardian coverage and critical arts and culture coverage in the triangle workable.

The post Renters of affordable housing in southeast Raleigh are concerned about losing their homes first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1623838270) } } ["channel"]=> array(8) { ["title"]=> string(24) "North Carolina Chronicle" ["link"]=> string(31) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com" ["description"]=> string(13) "Tarheel Times" ["lastbuilddate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 17 Jun 2021 00:17:12 +0000" ["language"]=> string(5) "en-US" ["sy"]=> array(2) { ["updateperiod"]=> string(9) " hourly " ["updatefrequency"]=> string(4) " 1 " } ["generator"]=> string(30) "https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.2" ["tagline"]=> string(13) "Tarheel Times" } ["textinput"]=> array(0) { } ["image"]=> array(0) { } ["feed_type"]=> string(3) "RSS" ["feed_version"]=> string(3) "2.0" ["encoding"]=> string(5) "UTF-8" ["_source_encoding"]=> string(0) "" ["ERROR"]=> string(0) "" ["WARNING"]=> string(0) "" ["_CONTENT_CONSTRUCTS"]=> array(6) { [0]=> string(7) "content" [1]=> string(7) "summary" [2]=> string(4) "info" [3]=> string(5) "title" [4]=> string(7) "tagline" [5]=> string(9) "copyright" } ["_KNOWN_ENCODINGS"]=> array(3) { [0]=> string(5) "UTF-8" [1]=> string(8) "US-ASCII" [2]=> string(10) "ISO-8859-1" } ["stack"]=> array(0) { } ["inchannel"]=> bool(false) ["initem"]=> bool(false) ["incontent"]=> bool(false) ["intextinput"]=> bool(false) ["inimage"]=> bool(false) ["current_namespace"]=> bool(false) ["last_modified"]=> string(31) "Thu, 17 Jun 2021 01:45:59 GMT " ["etag"]=> string(29) "W+KMlLRh2NvjDGD05riBBacqsXI " }